Woven Together Differently

Adventures in social media enlightenment


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Review: Mobile for Good by Heather Mansfield

cover_mobileforgoodWhen I took up my current job role, doing communications for an NGO, I started looking around for useful social media resources for NGOs and charities. In my search I came across Nonprofit Tech for Good and immediately signed up for their newsletter. That was how I found out about Mobile for Good by Heather Mansfield. I can quite honestly say that I had difficulty putting Mobile for Good down once I started reading it (though perhaps that says more about me and my social media obsession). I bought the ebook version, but I’d recommend getting a paper copy and sticking it next to your computer at work! Continue reading

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Does Facebook increase self-esteem or make us more depressed?

Image by Phil Shirley. Used under a CC 2.0 license.

Image by Phil Shirley. Used under a CC 2.0 license.

A few of my Facebook friends are taking part in the #100HappyDays challenge, which involves sharing a picture of something that makes you happy, every day for 100 days. It got me wondering about whether such “challenges” actually work. It also got me wondering about the role that Facebook plays in our emotional states. Does it have a positive impact on our emotions or does it create and reinforce negative feelings? Continue reading


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The internet is full of fluff and click-bait

Image by ginnerobot. Used under a CC 2.0 license.

Image by ginnerobot. Used under a CC 2.0 license.

As part of my digital spring clean, I’ve been trying to kick the terrible habit I have of seeing an interesting looking article, opening it in a new tab and then never reading it. I end up with so many tabs open that the favicons are no longer visible and I have no idea what any of the tabs are. I decided to sort through the tabs I already had open and as I was doing so I read a few of them. I was surprised to find that most of them weren’t very interesting. They had click-bait titles that had drawn me in, but actually the articles themselves weren’t very substantive – they were fluff. Continue reading


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Why I’ve decided to have a social media spring clean

Image by Susy Morris. Used under a CC 2.0 license.

Image by Susy Morris. Used under a CC 2.0 license.

I recently started following a blog called Study Hacks, from computer scientist and academic, Cal Newport. Study Hacks is about decoding patterns of success and looking at why it is that some people have successful careers and are able to lead meaningful lives, whilst others are continually seeking after their life’s passion. Newport argues against the passion hypothesis and instead believes that finding fulfilling work is about honing your craft. 

I first encountered Newport’s blog via a post he wrote about why he has never joined Facebook. In fact, Cal Newport doesn’t use any social media at all (unless you count blogging as social media, which I would argue it is). In reference to Facebook, Newport asks – what problem do I have that this solves? The answer, for Newport, is that it only offers something new, it doesn’t solve a pre-existing problem. Continue reading


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How visible should social media icons be?

Image by Patrick Denker. Used under a CC 2.0 license.

Image by Patrick Denker. Used under a CC 2.0 license.

Working in social media, I often find myself going to company websites in order to find out about their social media presence, so it can be very frustrating when companies and organisations hide the social media icons away or make them so minute that they’re impossible to see. It seems so counter intuitive to me – surely you want people to click through to your Facebook or Twitter profile and follow your company on social media. Why hide the icons away? They should be large and placed at the top of every web page.

At least, that’s what I thought. However, I came across an interesting argument the other week that had me thinking twice about my previous stance on social media icons. The argument goes that because your website is the central focus of your online presence and you want to drive traffic to your website, not away, social media icons shouldn’t be prominently displayed because people will simply click straight through to Facebook and before they’ve even looked at your Page they’ll be distracted by the pictures of cute cats that their friends are posting. Therefore, social media icons should be placed at the bottom of your company’s web pages, not the top. Continue reading


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Why are images for social media articles always so dull?

Image by Jason A. Howie. Used under a Creative Commons 2.0 license.

Image by Jason A. Howie. Used under a Creative Commons 2.0 license.

I spend quite a lot of time reading online articles about social media. Since starting this blog I’ve also spent a lot of time looking for images to accompany my posts and it struck me recently – images for social media articles are really boring. Most of the time it’s either the Facebook or Twitter logo or a picture of a mobile or laptop screen. I’ve tried to avoid this as much as possible with my own blog posts, but it’s not easy. Continue reading


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This much we know: people don’t like change

Small change. Image by Adam Bartlett. Used under a Creative Commons 2.0 license.

Small change. Image by Adam Bartlett. Used under a Creative Commons 2.0 license.

Twitter recently launched a new design. I must have been part of a group to receive the new design early, because I was already perfectly comfortable with the new look when everyone else started angrily tweeting about it. In fact, my boyfriend was on Twitter as it happened and let out a cry of dismay. From my vantage point I tried to offer comfort:

That’s not to say that I too wasn’t initially dismayed. But once I recognised this gut reaction in myself, I took a minute to step back and look at the new design objectively. Once I did that, I realised it actually wasn’t that bad. Okay, I thought, I can live with this. Continue reading